Women In Network

Introduction

When you think about networking, what comes to mind? Maybe it’s the image of a group of middle-aged men in suits shaking hands and smiling for the camera. If that’s your idea of a good time, then you should probably skip this section. After all, we’re here to talk about how women are transforming the world of business and making waves in the process. Women are 50% of the US population—and they’re not just sitting at home knitting while men go out there and earn money (not that there’s anything wrong with knitting). Women account for 85% of consumer purchases, so if you want to win customers over then you need to know how they think and what they want. Women control 51% of total U.S. wealth—which means they’ve got plenty saved up for investments! And finally: women start businesses at twice the rate as men do…and those female-owned firms employ more than 19 million people across America! There’s lots more where that came from too…keep reading on down below!

Women are 50% of the US population.

  • Women are 50% of the US population, yet they make up only 20% of the workforce.

  • This means that there is a large part of the population that is not being represented in the workforce.

Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases.

Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases.

Women influence 70% of all consumer purchases.

Women make most of the purchasing decisions for their households, including food and beverage choices, healthcare, clothing and accessories, cosmetics and beauty products, home furnishings and decorating supplies, child care products and services such as diapers, baby formula or nursery items; women also contribute to most travel purchases.

Women control 51% of total U.S. wealth.

Women control 51% of total U.S. wealth, which amounts to $14 trillion in assets. Women are less likely than men to have a traditional retirement plan (401(k)), but they still control $7 trillion in these assets and $5 trillion in real estate assets. Women also own more stocks and mutual funds than men do: about 37% of all stock market holdings, or about $3 trillion worth of stocks and mutual fund shares combined!

Women’s financial decisions have made them the top earning group for several years now; their net worth has increased by 11% since 2013 — four times faster than it did for men (2%). The average American woman has nearly twice the amount saved in her 401(k) as an average man does ($58,000 vs $30,000).

Women start businesses at twice the rate of men, and women-owned firms employ more than 19 million people in the U.S.

Women-owned firms employ more than 19 million people in the U.S., according to the Small Business Administration. This is a great opportunity for women to start their own business and create jobs for others. The number of women starting businesses has been increasing steadily, with an estimated 18% increase between 2007 and 2008, according to SBA statistics.

Women take more calculated risks than men on a regular basis, and are more likely to pursue business opportunities when presented with them.

Women take more calculated risks than men on a regular basis, and are more likely to pursue business opportunities when presented with them. According to a study conducted by the Women’s Business Center, women are more likely to take a chance on something that could be a good opportunity, even if it is risky. Women will also take their time weighing the pros and cons of an idea or proposal before moving forward with it. This approach could be attributed to the fact that women are less likely than men to want their decisions questioned or criticized by others, so they tend not to share their plans until they’re ready for them to become public knowledge – often after they’ve already made up their minds about what different choices would lead them toward success (or failure).

There is only 1 female CEO for every 6 male CEOs among Fortune 500 companies.

If you’re a woman and you’ve ever worked your way up the ladder, you might have noticed a shocking disparity between male and female CEOs. Among Fortune 500 companies, there is only 1 female CEO for every 6 male CEOs. Women are not given the same opportunities as men when it comes to leadership roles or executive positions of any kind. It’s pretty much impossible for me to believe that this disparity is due to skill differences—women just aren’t getting the chances they deserve!

Only 7% of senior management jobs at Silicon Valley tech firms are held by women.

Only 7% of senior management jobs at Silicon Valley tech firms are held by women. The reasons why have been widely debated, but a new study suggests that one key reason is that women in the industry aren’t asking for raises as often as men.

The study, conducted by Boston Consulting Group, surveyed 2,500 men and women across the U.S., U.K., Australia, Germany and France and found that while both men and women understood the benefits of asking for a raise—such as gaining recognition within their company or bargaining power with their employer—women were more concerned about being perceived negatively than they were about not getting what they wanted out of an increased salary. Men were less likely to be worried about how their boss would react if they asked for more money:

  • 27% of female respondents said they had never asked for a raise; only 13% of males reported this same experience

  • 28% of female respondents said they had asked but not received; just 16% of males reported this outcome

Networking should be more inclusive and include more women

You may not realize it, but networking is important to women. Women are 50% of the U.S. population and account for 85% of all consumer purchases—that’s a lot of people with money to spend! And women control 51% of total U.S. wealth, which makes them an important demographic to target when marketing products or services.

In addition to being a huge market segment, women also start businesses at twice the rate of men, and woman-owned firms employ more than 19 million people in the U.S., according to The National Women’s Business Council (NWC). It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for customers or clients; knowing how best reach out and engage this group can help grow your business tremendously!

Conclusion

It can be easy to fall into the trap of thinking that women don’t need networking opportunities as much as men do. However, this simply isn’t the case. Women are making up an increasing percentage of business owners, and they have a lot to offer both personally and professionally. By embracing diversity and inclusivity in your network, you will find great success in connecting with women who want nothing more than to help each other out.